Category: programming

Learning about tech stacks

When I learned my first programming language (Javascript) my next question was – what are the existing frameworks and how can I integrate it quickly to build things? 

Today it’s never been easier – websites like Stack Share show you what frameworks, libraries, database types and back ends have been used by individual companies. 

The sessions I attended at We Rise Women in Tech conference

The first We Rise Women in Tech conference, June 23 – 24th was organized by Women Who Code Atlanta. I’m in my mid-fifties, and after a mid-life career reboot (second degree), and starting some of the organizations I felt were essential to my – and others’ success in the Birmingham metro region – was only now getting out to my first tech conference.  I was looking forward to more of the welcoming environment that I had found at the first Women Who Code hackathon in July 2016. I had to work Friday (the first day), so was only able to attend the Saturday sessions. My notes on the sessions I attended continue below the break.

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Building a project portfolio – how to get started

In many cities with a tech scene there is a need for programmers and developers who aren’t necessarily computer science (CS) majors. CS is great for understanding the structures underlying programming, how software interacts with hardware, and the mathematics behind compression, encryption, algorithms graphics and topology. Their skills and understanding are needed to build computing and programming structures and frameworks, for working out effective storage techniques, telecommunication methods, encryption and for a lot of security work.  You will always need these specialists. And, if you want to be a CEO of major tech company, the groundwork is vital.

But for the rest of us, a mix of our existing skillsets in combination with either a bootcamp or self-study with tutorials are the most effective ways to start a programming career. Our power is crossover knowledge. We’re going to be working in teams to build and implement using existing tools – and being able to learn quickly, effectively and put existing pieces together to solve people’s problems is the best way we can contribute.

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How to break into Birmingham’s tech industry

On Monday, September 12th, Women Who Code Birmingham held its Programming & Tech Career Development panel at UAB’s iLab at the Innovation Depot.

Twenty-seven women (and a few men) came out to learn what technical and software development employers are looking for in the Birmingham area, what to expect in a technical interview and how to ensure success starting a career after graduation from university, or when transitioning into the field from another career.

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How to organize a newbie-friendly hackathon

A few weeks back, I attended my first hackathon as an effective coder.  I was helped in this, in part, by the hackathon organizational style used by Women Who Code.at their first hackathon in 2016.  I liked it so much that I’m making notes as to what worked so that we can use it in Birmingham.

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My experience at the Women Who Code hackathon

 

Attending

I attended my first hackathon a few weeks ago.* It was organized by the Atlanta, Tampa and Greenville networks of Women Who Code, a nonprofit focused on helping women advance their careers in the software and tech industries.

It was awesome. For the first time, I wasn’t terrified of not knowing something, of being found inadequate, or of not being able to contribute to a team. As a mid-life career changer, I’m still a relative noob when it comes to programming. The Women Who Code hackathon organizers did several things to help myself (and many others!) get past our fears and do good work at our first hackathon.

  • They organized a pre-hackathon orientation session Friday afternoon, in which they ran through what to expect, team roles and how our final products and pitches would be scored. Knowing what to expect helped me settle in and focus on how I could help my team and not worry about hitting ill-defined performance targets.
  • They had mentors (subject matter and programming language experts) available throughout the hackathon, to help teams get past knowledge sticking points.
  • Food – we were NOT going to starve. There was lots of non-carb food, coffee, and caffeine, all necessary for sustained work.
  • Finally, everyone presented. Didn’t matter how big or small the final application was – you talked about it.

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How to pick a first programming language infographic

Parking some links for a session I’m doing at the Women Who Code Birmingham network tonight.

One of the big questions I had when I first started programming was…. how to pick a first programming language. No student or prof would – or could – give me a straight answer as to what languages were the most useful for different applications.

Recently, I stumbled across Carl Cheo’s great flow chart on picking a first programming language based on what you need to do. I hope you find this useful and informative as I do – it’s something that I wish had been available when I first started dabbling in programming.

The other question newbies often ask is “what exactly do programmers do?” Carl Cheo has a second great infographic that answers that question.

Web and HTML refreshers

Web is where I started coding – and the current projects I need to finish fine-tuning and tweaking are all web sites, wiki and CRM-related. So, I’ve been running through Code School’s tutorials to refresh my acquaintance with material I first read and started working with prior to heading back to school. My objective is to write some necessary backend tweaks to the Red Mountain Maker site and work up some portfolio samples.

A code skills to-do list

Parking this here until I can circle back around to it. Swiped from an article about Pop Up Code’s offering in Huntsville. Things to learn for web development:

• Ruby on Rails
• HTML and CSS (first checked off, know the second, just need to work with it more . Edit – as of May 27th, have done a fair amount of review and am ready to start building some little samples and templates.)
• Twitter Bootstrap (yeah…..)
• Domain modeling for database-backed web applications
• Understanding and utilizing APIs (well along on this bit)

 

 

Computing – A Concise History

Computing: A Concise HistoryComputing: A Concise History by Paul E. Ceruzzi
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

While I was back at school, I was desperate for a history of computing that would give me a framework on which to hang all the new information I was acquiring. This is the book I wish I had.

Published in 2012, it’s a tight, well-written, (short!) book, that ties together the technical developments of the 19th century, 1920s, 30s, 40s & 50s into a clear, concise story of how different technical developers (and their resulting tools and ideas) were able to build on earlier work to create systems to first, automate calculations using hardware, and then later, develop the first programs and software.

One of the clearer histories written to date, this will serve as a good beginning orientation for all people who are starting to explore computer technology, and who want a context in which to place current modern devices and software. Shirley Bob gives it two thumbs up.

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